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Posts Tagged ‘United Kingdom

UK launches ‘Highly Trusted Sponsor Scheme’ for Education Providers

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The UK Government has launched the ‘Highly Trusted Sponsor Scheme’ for education providers under Tier 4 of the points-based system. This means that Tier 4 sponsors can apply for a Highly Trusted Sponsor licence from March 22, 2010 and the register of highly trusted sponsors will go live on Tuesday 6 April 2010.
Under the UK’s points-based system for controlling migration, all sponsors are rated according to their track record and procedures for monitoring overseas students. The new scheme, according to the UK Immigration authorities is about immigration control, not academic achievement. To qualify as a highly trusted sponsor, an education provider must have a proven track record in recruiting genuine international students who comply with immigration rules while they are in the UK.
Compared with other Tier 4 (General) sponsors, a highly trusted sponsor will be able to offer a wider range of courses to overseas students. It will also be offered new services and benefits, such as a dedicated account management function and a more flexible approach to reporting student non-attendance.
Under Tier 4 of the points-based system, all sponsors receive an ‘A’ or ‘B’ rating. The new Highly Trusted Sponsor category is a further segmentation of this sponsor rating system. It is designed to identify those sponsors who have the highest levels of compliance with their sponsor obligations, and whose students are showing the greatest compliance with the terms of their visa or permission to stay.
Highly trusted sponsors will be expected to meet the published criteria in full throughout the period when they hold a Highly Trusted Sponsor licence. In return they will be given a number of additional freedoms and benefits for the duration of their registration, and will be offered new services.
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Written by MithrasLaw

March 23, 2010 at 8:53 pm

Posted in UK Immigration

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UK Announces Tougher Rules for Foriegn Students

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Foreign students,outside of the European Union, wanting to come to the UK study will be now required to meet stricter entry criteria according to British Home Secretary, Alan Johnson.
Yesterday Mr. Johnson announced that students wanting to study in the UK will have to show more robust documentation, including financial proof of being able to study and live in the UK.
New measures introduced include:
  • a good standard of English (equivalent of holding just below a GCSE in a foreign language) will be needed to come to the UK and study to improve English language competency further;
  • a good standard of English (again equivalent of holding just below a GCSE in a foreign language) will need to be demonstrated to study any other course below degree level;
  • restricting the lowest-level courses (A levels and equivalent) to only the most trusted institutions;
  • halving the amount of time a student studying below first degree level or on a foundation degree course will be able to work, to just 10 hours during term time;
  • a ban on bringing in dependants for anyone studying a course for less than six months; and
  • a ban on dependants of anyone studying a course lower than foundation or undergraduate degree level from working – or being subject to removal from the UK if found doing so.
  • introduction of tougher criteria for defining which course providers count as ‘highly trusted sponsors’ of foreign students. All publicly funded universities and colleges will count as highly trusted, and private training colleges can also gain that status.

The Home Secretary also announced that the UK government will implement plans to introduce a points test by 2011 for those who wish to earn British citizenship.

Written by MithrasLaw

February 11, 2010 at 11:04 am

United Kingdom To Introduce New Controls to Help Protect its Workforce

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The UK government has accepted the recommendation made by the Migration Advisory Committee to tighten up rules controlling skilled workers that are allowed to take up jobs in the UK under its point-based system so as to further support British workers and to give them an opportunity to apply first for jobs before hiring skilled workers from outside Europe.

From 2010, all jobs in the UK will need to be advertised for 4 weeks (extended from 2 weeks) in Jobcenter Plus to British workers before companies can hire non-European workers.

Additional measures that will be undertaken to protect jobs for the British workforce will be extending the qualifying period for overseas workers who want to transfer for work at their company’s UK office as well an increase of minimum salary that qualifies a skilled worker to be eligible to work in the UK from 17,000 to 20,000 Pounds Sterling.

Written by MithrasLaw

September 14, 2009 at 4:07 pm

UK Immigration and Asylum Statistics Released Today Reveals Decline in Migration

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The UK Home Office today released immigration and asylum statistics. The immigration statistics cover migration from Eastern Europe, asylum applications, removals, and voluntary departures and statistics show a dramatic decline in migration due to  global recession, tougher immigration laws, and stricter enforcement. 
Work applications from the eight accession countries, namely Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Hungary, Slovakia, Slovenia, Estonia and the Czech Republic, have fallen to the lowest level since 2004 – when these eight countries joined the European Union.
In the first three months of 2009 there were 23,000 applications from workers of the above mentioned countries — down from 48,755 in the same period in 2008. The decrease is mainly explained by a drop in Polish applicants, which fell to 12,000 in the first quarter of 2009 from 32,000 in the same period in 2008.
The Bulgarian and Romanian Accession Statistics show that applications from these two countries have also fallen to the lowest level since they joined the EU in 2007. There were 610 applications for accession worker cards and 6,205 applications for registration certificates in the first quarter of 2009.
The Control of Immigration Statistics show that between January and March this year 15,840 people who had no right to be here were removed from the country or departed voluntarily. In the same period in 2008 16,760 people were removed or departed voluntarily.
These statistics also show that the United Kingdom continues to receive fewer asylum applications per head of the population than many of its European counterparts.
Border and Immigration Minister Phil Woolas said, “Our border has never been stronger. Last year we prevented over 28,000 individual attempts to cross the Channel illegally and the number of illegals found in Kent fell by nearly 90 per cent.
We are making the United Kingdom a more hostile place for illegal immigrants through our tough civil penalties regime which has seen fines worth a potential £18 million issued to businesses that have employed people with no right to work.”

The UK Home Office today released immigration and asylum statistics. The immigration statistics cover migration from Eastern Europe, asylum applications, removals, and voluntary departures. The statistics released show a dramatic decline in migration due to  global recession, tougher immigration laws, stricter enforcement, and individuals desiring to return to their home countries. 

Work applications from the eight accession countries, namely, Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Hungary, Slovakia, Slovenia, Estonia and the Czech Republic, have fallen to the lowest level since 2004 – when these eight countries joined the European Union.

In the first three months of 2009 there were 23,000 applications from workers of the above mentioned countries — down from 48,755 in the same period in 2008. The decrease is mainly explained by a drop in Polish applicants, which fell to 12,000 in the first quarter of 2009 from 32,000 in the same period in 2008. 

The majority of workers coming from the A8 countries in the twelve months to March 2009 are young – 78 per cent were aged between 18 and 34 -and only eight per cent stated they had dependants living with them in the United Kingdom when they registered.

The Bulgarian and Romanian Accession Statistics show that applications from these two countries have also fallen to the lowest level since they joined the EU in 2007. There were 610 applications for accession worker cards and 6,205 applications for registration certificates in the first quarter of 2009.

The Control of Immigration Statistics show that between January and March this year 15,840 people who had no right to be here were removed from the country or departed voluntarily. In the same period in 2008 16,760 people were removed or departed voluntarily.

Statistics also show that the United Kingdom continues to receive fewer asylum applications per head of the population than many of its European counterparts.

Border and Immigration Minister Phil Woolas said, “Our border has never been stronger. Last year we prevented over 28,000 individual attempts to cross the Channel illegally and the number of illegals found in Kent fell by nearly 90 per cent. We are making the United Kingdom a more hostile place for illegal immigrants through our tough civil penalties regime which has seen fines worth a potential £18 million issued to businesses that have employed people with no right to work.”

Written by MithrasLaw

May 20, 2009 at 2:02 pm

Exploring H1-B Visa Alternatives

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Whether you were unable to find a job in this economy, or unable to get your employer to sponsor you for an H-1B, or whether you were unable to get your H-1B application in on a timely fashion, whatever your reason may be for being unable to file the H-1B application by the April 1st date (for FY 2010), don’t despair, as there may be other visa options for you in the United States and/or in the United Kingdom.

See, our attorney, Hanishi Ali’s recent article published in India New England where she discusses the many alternatives to H-1B visas.

Written by MithrasLaw

April 8, 2009 at 3:26 pm

UN Report Indicates Britain to Become the Most Populous Country in the European Union by 2050

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A recent United Nations forecast reports that Britain is set to become the most populous country in the European Union by 2050. UN also suggested that Britain will be the third most attractive destination for migrants, after the USA and Canada over the next 40 years.

The UN’s biennial population forecast found that approximately 174,000 immigrants are set to arrive in Britain each year from now to 2050. This means that Britain will overtake Germany in being the most populous country in the European  Union and that UK’s population will swell to 72.4 million as opposed to Germany’s population of 70.5 million by the year 2050. Furthermore,  70 per cent of the increase in UK’s population is estimated to be a result of immigration. 

This no doubt will put more pressure on the UK Border Agency, which is responsible for securing the United Kingdom borders and controlling migration in the United Kingdom, to further tighten up its immigration policies and possibly revise its new point-based immigration system in the future.

Written by MithrasLaw

March 26, 2009 at 3:32 pm

UK is Cracking Down on Employment of Illegal Immigrants

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Recent estimates of illegal migrants in the European Union (EU) range between 4.5 and 8 million, with an estimated increase by 350,000 to 500,000 per year. From 7 to 16% of the EU’s GDP is estimated to come from the shadow economy, although this is not entirely staffed by illegal migrants. Construction, agriculture, house-work, cleaning, catering and other hospitality services are the sectors of the economy most prone to such undocumented work in general and attracting illegal migrants in particular.

UK, which has an estimated total of more than 500,000 illegal immigrants, is cracking down on employers caught hiring illegal aliens and has increased its enforcement operations by 40 percent over the past year.

 Employers are given an opportunity to respond or explain why illegal immigrants were working for them and those employers hiring illegal immigrants can be subject to fines of up to £10,000 per illegal and persistent offenders can face a jail sentence.

 To support employers, the UK Border Agency provides an employers’ helpline which they can use to check the status of potential employees.  For more information on the helpline see attached link.

 http://www.bia.homeoffice.gov.uk/employers/employersupport/

Written by MithrasLaw

January 15, 2009 at 5:22 pm

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